bambo invasive weed species

INVASIVE PLANT SPECIES CONTROL SOLUTIONS

Invasive plant species, such as Bamboo, Japanese Knotweed, Himalayan Balsam, and Giant Hogweed can cause serious damage if left uncontrolled. Bamboo and Japanese Knotweed are particularly difficult to manage as a result of their fast-growing and aggressive rhizome root systems. These species are notoriously resistant to physical removal because even a small fragment of rhizome root will regrow and develop a new and invasive plant.

THE DAMAGE JAPANESE KNOTWEED AND BAMBOO CAN CAUSE

Rapid growth, combined with the strength that these invasive plants accumulate through maturity, these species can break their way through many apparently robust manmade construction materials, such as concrete, brick, and asphalt. Their rapidly spreading interconnected rhizome roots systems facilitate their search for a breakthrough point across a relatively wide area where they then thrive via access to nutrients, water, and sunlight. The surface breakthrough can be problematic as the location of the main host plant may not be obvious. There are recorded cases of Japanese Knotweed finding its way into residential dwellings through cavity walls etc, which clearly has significant practical and economic implications for treatment, particularly when the source is difficult to identify and eradicate.

Japanese Knotweed effects up to 1.45 million homes throughout the UK, which amounts to around 5% of residential properties. Homeowners that have this invasive plant on their premises are likely to find their property value blighted. Furthermore any landowners who are deemed to have allowed these species to encroach on to neighbouring properties are likely to find themselves legally liable for the consequences. It is therefore clearly very important to control these invasive species as soon as possible and to maintain that control.

Invasive Japanese knotweed sprouting from the ground

THE BARRIER SOLUTION

Rapid growth, combined with the strength that these invasive plants accumulate through maturity, these species can break their way through many apparently robust manmade construction materials, such as concrete, brick, and asphalt. Their rapidly spreading interconnected rhizome roots systems facilitate their search for a breakthrough point across a relatively wide area where they then thrive via access to nutrients, water, and sunlight. The surface breakthrough can be problematic as the location of the main host plant may not be obvious. There are recorded cases of Japanese Knotweed finding its way into residential dwellings through cavity walls etc, which clearly has significant practical and economic implications for treatment, particularly when the source is difficult to identify and eradicate.
Japanese Knotweed effects up to 1.45 million homes throughout the UK, which amounts to around 5% of residential properties. Homeowners that have this invasive plant on their premises are likely to find their property value blighted. Furthermore any landowners who are deemed to have allowed these species to encroach on to neighbouring properties are likely to find themselves legally liable for the consequences. It is therefore clearly very important to control these invasive species as soon as possible and to maintain that control.

diagram of root barrier stopping bamboo roots
Invasive weed barrier installed vertically one meter below the ground surface.
Flourishing shoots and leaves
Roots under control, and only grow to a permitted space
Ground left uncontaminated from Bamboo or Japanese Knotweed rhizomes.
plantex root barrier being installed into the ground to stop bamboo shoots
du pont plantex being installed next to invasive bamboo plant

PLANTEX ROOT BARRIER

TERRAM ROOT BARRIER

hdpe root barrier being used to cap off contaminated land

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